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现金捕鱼诀窍Tom Harper: ‘They were taking these extraordinary risks to further human knowledge and to see the world differently’

Tom Harper: ‘They were taking these extraordinary risks to further human knowledge and to see the world differently’

  • James Mottram
  • 31 October 2019

Tom Harper: 'They were taking these extraordinary risks to further human knowledge and to see the world differently'

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Wild Rose director discusses his latest epic and immersive tale, The Aeronauts, which transforms true events from Victorian England

‘I don’t want to get into a fight with the Royal Society,’ says Tom Harper – clearly about to do just that – ‘but they were the first people to say, “Why didn’t you pick a female scientist?”‘ The British director behind Wild Rose is talking about his new film, The Aeronauts, starring Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones. Set in 1862, it follows groundbreaking meteorologist James Glaisher as he makes a record-breaking asce手机捕鱼赚现金软件nt in a gas balloon, to gain insights into forces influencing the weather.

Last year, Keith Moore, Head of Library at the Royal Society – the independent scientific academy of the UK – criticised Harper’s film for ‘airbrushing’ Glaisher’s male companion, balloonist Henry Coxwell, out of the story. ‘I wanted it not to be two middle-aged men in a basket,’ shrugs Harper, when we meet in London’s Rosewood Hotel. ‘I wanted it to be reflective for a contemporary audience.’ He and screenwriter Jack Thorne replaced Coxwell with Amelia Wren, a fictional character inspired by Sophie Blanchard, a real-life aeronaut and daredevil pilot who died when Glaisher was just 10.

Complaining that Coxwell’s bravery – he saved the flight at one point when the balloon began to fly upwards uncontrollably – was being overlooked, Moore commented to The Daily Telegraph, ‘There were so many deserving female scientists of that period who haven’t had films made about them. Why not do that instead?’ Evidently peeved by the comment, Harper retorts: ‘It’s true. There were female scientists around at the time, but not in the Royal Society, because they weren’t allowed in the Royal Society until 1948 or something, and even to this day, only eight percent of the Royal Society is female.’

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